Vincentian footballers sacrifice for their dreams

Vincentian footballers sacrifice for their dreams

Twins Mickele and Maykele Culzac continue to go the distance despite the hand they were dealt with from birth.

The 22-year-old Vincentians were a part of a triplet. Unfortunately, both their sister and mother died during childbirth, leaving them to be raised by their grandmother.

They told NATION  they left their beloved St Vincent to seek greener pastures playing football.

After completing last football season with the Barbados Football Association’s (BFA) Division 2 club Horthersal Turning, they left the island but returned in September to play for Central League Spartans – a recently promoted Division 1 football club.

“We played with a second division team, but our standard is higher. We play premier football back in St Vincent for SV United. Our dream was always to play football so we decided to try. We wanted the experience out of the country and to experience different football, a different culture, a different atmosphere, meeting new people,” said Maykele, the more talkative of the two.

The former national players said with them added to Spartans, they stood a great chance of being promoted to the BFA’s Premier League.

“It is not just us but the other players too. The team was playing good from the beginning of the season this year, so we added to the team to give it a bigger boost and give them a better chance of reaching the Premier League. Once we play as a team, we will make it,” Maykele said.

They said that as they grew up with their grandmother, she always liked to see them playing football and enjoyed hearing their names on the radio.

“When we reach home she would always be happy and say, ‘I hear unna name over the radio today’ . . . . When we get the opportunity to play here, she just tell us go,” Mickele said.

Unfortunately, a month before they returned in September, their grandmother passed away at age 67.

“It was hard the first time because we left her sick, but she push us and tell us try, go at it,” Maykele said, adding they had left their children and girlfriends behind in their native land.

Admitting that they do “get away plenty”, they readily agreed they couldn’t do without each other.

“That is why we always together. I could have leave him in St Vincent, but I had to bring him with me. We could fight now, but if anybody opposes either one, the other will defend him.

“We have switched schools – any craziness you can think of we have done it. People can’t really tell us apart; that’s why we colour our hair for people to be able to tell us apart. Seeing us together you might be able to tell the difference, but if you see us alone, most people can’t tell,” Maykele explained. 

“People I don’t know would pass and say,  ‘Aye, twin’, and I would hold a conversation with them, and go home and tell him what the person tell me. So when next he see the person, he would continue the conversation like it is he who had the conversation in the first place,” he added, laughing heartily while his brother joined in.  (www.Nationnews.com)

One Response to Vincentian footballers sacrifice for their dreams

  • Vincentian footballers sacrifice for their dreams

    Vincentian footballers sacrifice for their dreams

    Twins Mickele and Maykele Culzac continue to go the distance despite the hand they were dealt with from birth.

    The 22-year-old Vincentians were a part of a triplet. Unfortunately, both their sister and mother died during childbirth, leaving them to be raised by their grandmother.

    They told NATION  they left their beloved St Vincent to seek greener pastures playing football.

    After completing last football season with the Barbados Football Association’s (BFA) Division 2 club Horthersal Turning, they left the island but returned in September to play for Central League Spartans – a recently promoted Division 1 football club.

    “We played with a second division team, but our standard is higher. We play premier football back in St Vincent for SV United. Our dream was always to play football so we decided to try. We wanted the experience out of the country and to experience different football, a different culture, a different atmosphere, meeting new people,” said Maykele, the more talkative of the two.

    The former national players said with them added to Spartans, they stood a great chance of being promoted to the BFA’s Premier League.

    “It is not just us but the other players too. The team was playing good from the beginning of the season this year, so we added to the team to give it a bigger boost and give them a better chance of reaching the Premier League. Once we play as a team, we will make it,” Maykele said.

    They said that as they grew up with their grandmother, she always liked to see them playing football and enjoyed hearing their names on the radio.

    “When we reach home she would always be happy and say, ‘I hear unna name over the radio today’ . . . . When we get the opportunity to play here, she just tell us go,” Mickele said.

    Unfortunately, a month before they returned in September, their grandmother passed away at age 67.

    “It was hard the first time because we left her sick, but she push us and tell us try, go at it,” Maykele said, adding they had left their children and girlfriends behind in their native land.

    Admitting that they do “get away plenty”, they readily agreed they couldn’t do without each other.

    “That is why we always together. I could have leave him in St Vincent, but I had to bring him with me. We could fight now, but if anybody opposes either one, the other will defend him.

    “We have switched schools – any craziness you can think of we have done it. People can’t really tell us apart; that’s why we colour our hair for people to be able to tell us apart. Seeing us together you might be able to tell the difference, but if you see us alone, most people can’t tell,” Maykele explained. 

    “People I don’t know would pass and say,  ‘Aye, twin’, and I would hold a conversation with them, and go home and tell him what the person tell me. So when next he see the person, he would continue the conversation like it is he who had the conversation in the first place,” he added, laughing heartily while his brother joined in.  (www.Nationnews.com)